Coastal Zone Development

Taxonomy Term List

Reducing vulnerability to coastal flooding through ecosystem-based adaptation in Cuba

Mangroves cover more than 5% of the total area of Cuba and play a vital protective role against effects of storm surges and sea level rise. This UNDP-supported project, "Reduction of vulnerability to coastal flooding through ecosystem-based adaptation in the south of Artemisa and Mayabeque provinces," seeks to reduce the vulnerability of communities in coastal areas of Artemisa and Mayabeque provinces from climate change related coastal erosion, flooding and saltwater intrusion.

Undefined
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Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (-82.7929687751 22.7761815304)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Local communities in Artemisa and Mayabeque provinces
Funding Source: 
Financing Amount: 
$ 6,067,320
Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

With the objective of increasing the resilience of populations in the coastal regions of Artemisa and Mayabeque provinces to the effects of climate change, the project will have the following key components –

Component 1: Reduction of the impacts of coastal flooding through the recovery of coastal ecosystems Re-establishment of coastal belt of red mangrove between Surgidero de Batabanó and Punta Mora (Output 1.1); Restoration of mangrove ecosystems between Majana and Surgidero de Batabanó (Output 1.2) and; Elimination and/or control of invasive alien species in coastal wetlands between Majana and Punta Mora (Output 1.3)

Component 2: Integrated and participatory management of coastal ecosystems to increase resilience to climate change Ecosystem-based adaptation mainstreamed into integrated coastal zone planning and productive sector activities (Output 2.1); Buy-in, participation and governance in local communities (Output 2.2) and; knowledge management systems at community level (Output 2.3)

Component 3: Establishment of a favourable enabling environment at regional level for the effectiveness and sustainability of adaptation investments Consolidated information on costs and benefits of EBA available to decision makers and planners (Output 3.1); Strengthened institutions including provincial and municipal Governments, Forest Guard Corps, Frontier Guards and Fisheries Department supporting ecosystem-based adaptation actions (Output 3.2

Contacts: 
UNDP
Lyes Ferroukhi
Regional Technical Advisor
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Project Status: 

CBA Viet Nam: Minimizing Climate Change Impacts for Sustainable Aquaculture in Con Truong, Hoang Chau Commune

Aquaculture is the main activity and source of income for the 8,264 residents of Viet Nam’s Hoang Chau community. The nearby Truong Islet plays a key role in the aquaculture development of the region, as it prevents ocean waves and winds from reaching Hoang Chau Commune and its small mangrove forest area, which helps to preserve local biodiversity. Due to climate change impacts, including saltwater intrusion from strong winds and high waves brought upon by global warming, the region’s ecosystem is very fragile.  Local shrimp banks are constantly affected by the sea (winds, waves and salt contamination) and inland factors (water pollution from Ma River headwater and human activities). All these factors are destroying sea dykes, and the cost of reinforcing the degraded dyke is high. Since the 1970s, limited financial capacities have prevented shrimp farming methods from evolving, and they remain highly dependent on climate conditions. Climatic impacts have led to a reliance on natural resources, resulting in their overexploitation. To face these challenges, the local community is looking for appropriate production models that can adapt to extreme climate change.

This Community-Based Adaptation project aims to promote sustainable fisheries development by testing climate change adaptation models in aquaculture and fishing. Thanh Hoa Fisheries Association initiated the project after extensive discussions with local residents through a participatory process actively involving the Hoang Chau community. The project aims at testing climate change adaptation models in aquaculture and fishing for sustainable fisheries development in Truong Islet, a brackish water region in Thanh Hoa Province and Hoang Chau Commune.

This project is part of Viet Nam's Community-Based Adaptation portfolio. *

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Key Collaborators: 
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Coordinates: 
POLYGON ((105.754852288 19.8342171669, 105.793304436 19.8303416445, 105.793304436 19.7980419489, 105.761718743 19.7954576899, 105.754852288 19.8342171669))
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Coastal Communities; Farmers
Financing Amount: 
$50,000
Project Details: 

Thanh Hoa is a province in the north of Central Vietnam, with 102 kilometers of coastline, 17,000,000 square kilometers of ocean surface and a population of over 3.6 million. The coastal and gulf area is favourable for aquaculture development. Ponds, lakes and shallow areas for aquaculture and riziculture make up 7,500 hectares. About 480,000 people rely on aquaculture for their primary income. The annual gross of fisheries products is 75,000 tons, 45,000 tons of which come from ocean exploitation and 30,000 tons from aquaculture. The potential to develop aquaculture is great, yet crop failures are common due to frequent natural disasters, exhausted coastal resources, polluted water and diseases.

Located in the southeast of Hoang Chau Commune, Hoang Hoa District, Truong Islet has a crucial role to play in aquaculture development in both Hoang Chau and Thanh Hoa Province as a whole. The Islet has a brackish water aquaculture area of 300 hectares, accounting for 1/10 of the total brackish water aquaculture area in the Province. From an economic and social perspective, the Islet has a crucial role in preventing wave and wind impact on inner regions, including Hoang Chau Commune. From a biological perspective, Truong Islet has significant biodiversity on land and in the water.

In the 1970s and 1980s, the mangrove forest area in Truong Islet was relatively large (about 200 hectares), with many kinds of fisheries species like shrimps, crabs, oysters, and lots of fishes.

Shrimp farming first appeared in Truong Islet in the 1970s. At present, there are 5 divisions with 137 households doing aquaculture in Truong Islet, both natural resource exploitation and farming fisheries products. Hoang Chau fishermen are facing several challenges, including the impact of climate change. The change in salinity due to saltwater intrusion results in slow development or massive death of fisheries species. The residents have to make higher dykes to cope with higher sea levels. The temperature fluctuations weaken fisheries species and make them susceptible to disease and death. Small floods, which now come earlier in the year, make the residents harvest shrimp prematurely, affecting their economic value.

Fisheries resources in the region are seriously degrading. In recent years, Ma River has been polluted due to human activities, affecting the aquaculture in Truong Islet. Aquaculture in Truong islet is at high risk because of environmental pollution and unpredictable weather. Aquaculture techniques have not changed ever since they started this trade: they still use the conventional methods although breeds, climate and natural resources conditions have changed considerably as a result of environmental degradation and the negative impacts of climate change.

To address these challenges, this Community-Based Adaptation project implements the following key activities:

  1. Improve farming techniques in aquaculture and fishing to adapt to climate change
  2. Plant mangrove forests to reduce impact of natural disasters, to protect the surrounding banks and prevent erosion caused by sea level rise
  3. Protect and regenerate natural fisheries resources for sustainable exploitation of natural fisheries resources in the project area
  4. Experiment with a community revolving loan programme to assist affected fishermen in aquaculture development and disaster emergency
  5. Enhance community capacity and awareness on climate change and sustainable aquaculture issues
Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Outcome 1: Building and testing models to adapt to climate change in brackish water aquaculture and fishing

Design and test 3 Models with suitable species and crops (Output 1.1) and include 20 households that will benefit from these models (Output 1.2).

Outcome 2: Mangrove forests and resources are managed and used in a sustainable manner

Design a commune plan (Output 2.1) that plants at least 20 hectares of mangrove forests (Output 2.2), including beekeeping models that directly benefit at least 20 households (Output 2.3).

Outcome 3.0: A revolving loan programme is developed and managed by the community

Enroll at least 20 households in the loan programme in the first year (Output 3.1), and at least 30 more households by the end of the project (Output 3.2). Repay the investment for experimental models, to be put in the loan programme for revolving (Output 3.3).

Outcome 4.0: Training and awareness raising activities on CC issues and sustainable fisheries are conducted

Hold at least 4 awareness raising workshops for at least 300 participants (Output 4.1), at least 12 training sessions and 10 community workshops for at least 500 participants (Output 4.2), and about 50 community meetings to discuss project issues and activities (Output 4.3). Form and operate groups of key fishermen for monitoring environment protection, mangrove forest protection, exploitation of fisheries resources protection (Output 4.4) Develop and apply community regulation procedures (Output 4.5) while strengthening working relationships with related water management agencies to manage the water source and protect community’s rights (Output 4.6)

Outcome 5.0: Fisheries resources are regenerated.

Build a crab bank model at 3 different locations around Truong islet (Output 5.1) and organize 3 fish and shrimp releases in the project area (Output 5.2).

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

The Vulnerability Reduction Assessment (VRA) will be measured at the planning stage of the project, at the mid-point, and at the end of project. Given that the VRA is qualitative and is based on the community perceptions, the first VRA was conducted to establish a baseline during the Project planning phase as described above. A second VRA will be done at mid project after all the project model building activities have been completed. A final VRA will be done at the end of the project to assess the overall impact of the project on the community adaptive capacity.

The VRA questions that will be used are as follows:

  1. Rate the impact of climate change (extreme weather and early small flooding, temperature rise, sea level rise and salinity) on your income from aquaculture and fishing
  2. Rate your ability to cope with the negative impacts of climate change 3. Rate the impact on your livelihood if climate change impact doubles
  3. Rate how effective you think this project will be in reducing your risks from increasing natural disasters and temperature rise, sea level rise and salinisation.
  4. Rate your confidence that the project will continue to reduce climate change risks after the project ends.

The Impact Assessment System (IAS) indicator will be measured at the end of the project using the following components:

  1. The number of hectares/models of aquaculture development applying the project techniques in sustainable aquaculture and fishing to adapt to CC impact
  2. The number of hectares of mangroves protected and planted
  3. The number of innovations developed/applied under the project (4) The number of policy recommendations proposed in environmental protection and sustainable use of natural resources (fisheries and mangroves) for sustainable aquaculture and fishing in the climate change context

The targets for the above are as follows:

  1. Three (3) models will be tested by the project.
  2. 15-20 ha of mangroves will be protected and planted.
  3. 2-3 innovations developed/applied under the project
  4. Three to four recommendations on policies in sustainable aquaculture and fishing in the climate change context will be proposed to local authorities.
Contacts: 
UNDP
CBA Project Management Unit
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
SPA
Project Status: 

CBA Jamaica: Increasing Community Adaptation and Ecosystem Resilience to Climate Change in Portland Bight (CCAM)

Jamaica’s Portland Bight Protected Area includes some of the best remaining examples of coastal dry forest, the longest contiguous mangrove coastline in Jamaica, and some of the most important fish nurseries in the country. The project site has outstanding national and global importance because of its highly threatened biodiversity and ecological services. Due to climate variability, however, the Portland Bight communities of Old Harbour Bay, Hellshire, and Salt River are high risk areas for hurricanes, floods, fire and tsunamis, with more than 20,000 people living in the danger zones. Climate change also causes the loss and degradation of ecosystems, the loss of habitat for biodiversity, and the loss of ecosystem services such as coastal protection, fish nurseries, recharging of aquifers, control of soil erosion, and natural regeneration of forests. These factors threaten the lives and livelihoods of the local communities, who are very dependent on the surrounding environment.

This Community-Based Adaptation project reduces the threats to globally endangered biodiversity, ecosystems, and ecosystem services by empowering communities to manage ecosystems more sustainably in the face of climate change. Through workshops, communities' awareness of their importance and contribution to the economy will be increased, and the implementation of sustainable ecosystem use and adaptive alternatives will be taught.

This project is part of Jamaica's Community-Based Adaptation portfolio. *

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Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POLYGON ((-77.0258209128 17.9016637072, -76.9434234519 17.9362906251, -76.9063445944 17.8833675109, -76.9859954733 17.8474230664, -77.0258209128 17.9016637072))
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Coastal Communities; Fishers
Financing Amount: 
$48,000
Co-Financing Total: 
$46,000 (in cash); $10,200 (in kind)
Project Details: 

Portland Bight Protected Area (PBPA) includes coastline from Hellshire to Milk River on the South Coast of Jamaica. The coast is fringed with the longest contiguous stretch of mangroves in the country, seagrass beds, coral reefs and cays. These form the country’s largest nursery for fish, crustaceans and mollusks (including conch, Strombus gigas). The beaches provide nationally significant nesting habitat for globally threatened sea turtles (principally Hawksbill Eretmochelys imbricata) while the many rivers that drain the hinterland provide habitat for the globally threatened American Crocodile (Crocodylus acutus) as well as endemic fish. The wetlands include habitats for the globally threatened West Indian Whistling Duck (Dendrocygna arborea).

Overlooking the coast are three tropical dry forests – Hellshire Hills, Braziletto Mountains and Portland Ridge – which also house a variety of globally-significant species and ecosystems. These areas are surrounded by agriculture (mainly sugar cane) with pockets of settlement and industry, including 3 ports. All these habitats are already showing apparent signs of stress from climate change, including increased hurricane damage, increased drought and flood cycles and increased risk of fire. The neighboring marine ecosystems are likewise showing signs of stress. For example, coral reefs have low levels of living coral combined with high algae overgrowth and regular bleaching events.

The Protected Area includes three towns (Old Harbour Bay, Lionel Town and Hayes) and about forty-nine residential communities—nineteen of which are directly on the coast. This project focuses on the area’s most vulnerable settlements, which are close to the Portland Cottage, Salt River, Cockpit and Old Harbour Bay. These populations encompass a total of about 20,000 people whose main livelihoods depend directly or indirectly on fishing, sugar or bauxite. These areas form the hinterland for three fish sanctuaries. The communities are all low lying, mostly carved out of mangrove swamps and wetlands and their immediate environs. All have recent history of being affected by floods and hurricanes, and therefore have a high level of receptivity to vulnerability reduction measures in these areas.

The people of the area are particularly dependent on the maintenance of natural ecosystems because of the natural services they provide. This is true for all coastal communities but in Portland Bight the linkages are particularly close. The forests of the limestone hills in the immediate vicinity sustain the aquifers that support many springs and wells, while further inland forest hills reduce the frequency of flash flooding and reduce erosion. The area’s mangroves protect the coastline and the infrastructure behind it while providing nursery habitat for fishable resources.

Climate change is likely to increase temperatures, reduce summer rainfall, and increase the frequency of hurricanes, fires and floods. This will result in loss and degradation of ecosystems including tropical dry forests, wetlands (especially mangroves), coral reefs and seagrass beds. This will result in loss of habitat for biodiversity including the critically endangered species that occur in the area. There will also be loss of ecosystem services such as coastal protection, fish nurseries, recharging of aquifers, control of soil erosion, natural regeneration of forests.

This Community-Based Adaptation project will reduce the threats to globally endangered biodiversity, ecosystems and ecosystem services by seeking to empower communities to manage ecosystems more sustainably in the face of climate change. This will include increasing awareness of ecosystem importance and contribution to the economy, as well as promoting sustainable and alternative uses. The project will include awareness-raising on the impacts climate change presents for globally endangered biodiversity, ecosystems and ecosystem services (and hence livelihoods). It will advocate for integrating ecosystem services into development frameworks at the local and national levels.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Outcome 1: All major stakeholder groups informed about climate change threat and adaptation options

Design and implement a stakeholder awareness programme (Output 1.1), including a technical workshop for administrators, planners, government officials, politicians, land managers, and developers (Output 1.2). Hold a community workshop (Output 1.3) and develop a manual (Output 1.4) intended to bolster community involvement in reviewing Environmental Impact Assessments. Hold two vulnerability reduction assessments (Output 1.5). Produce a teacher’s guide, a student booklet, and teacher training workshop (Output 1.6), then design and site a wetland interpretation centre (Output 1.7). Ensure that adaptation to climate change is included in management planning for fish sanctuaries (Output 1.8), hold a climate change adapotation expo (Output 1.9) and establish C-CAM as first responder to disasters (Output 1.10).

Outcome 2: Five stakeholder groups involved in monitoring impacts of climate change

Purchase monitoring equipment (Output 2.1) and establish notice boards on three fishing beaches (Output 2.2). Hire and train nine community monitors (Output 2.3) to establish and operationalize a beach monitoring programme (Output 2.4). Map fish sanctuary benthos (Output 2.5) and implement photographic monitoring of terrestrial areas (Output 2.6) to complement a community reporting system (Output 2.7).

Outcome 3: Establish at least two demonstration activities involving stakeholders in minimizing climate change impacts

Pilot a rainwater harvesting demonstration (Output 3.1), hold a sustainable livelihoods entrepreneurship workshop (Output 3.2), and submit at least two follow-up proposals implementing community suggestions for adaptation projects (Output 3.3).

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

Monitoring and evaluation for community-based adaptation is a new field, and the CBA project is piloting innovative approaches to evaluating the success of locally-driven adaptation projects, and generating lessons to inform ongoing practice.

Key considerations in M&E for CBA include:

  • Grounding M&E in the local context: M&E for CBA should avoid overly rigid frameworks, recognizing community heterogeneity and maintaining local relevance
  • Capturing global lessons from local projects: CBA projects are highly contextualized, but lessons generated should be relevant to stakeholders globally
  • Incorporation of both quantitative and qualitative indicators: to ground projects in tangible changes that can be objectively evaluated, and to capture lessons and case studies for global dissemination

To these ends, the CBA project uses three indicator systems: the Vulnerability Reduction Assessment, the Small Grants Programme Impact Assessment System, and the UNDP Climate Change Adaptation Indicator Framework.

The Vulnerability Reduction Assessment (VRA)

The VRA is a question-based approach with the following aims:

  • To make M&E responsive to community priorities
  • To use M&E to make projects more accountable to local priorities
  • To make M&E capture community ideas and local knowledge
  • To gather community-level feedback to guide ongoing project management
  • To generate qualitative information
  • To capture lessons on specific issues within community-based adaptation
  • To generate case studies highlighting adaptation projects

The VRA follows UNDP's Adaptation Policy Framework, and is measured in a series of meetings with local community stakeholders. In these meetings, locally-tailored questions based on standard VRA questions/indicators are posed, and the community assigns a numerical score on a 1-10 scale for each question. Progress is evaluated through changes in scores over the course of implementation, as well as through qualitative data collected in community discussions surrounding the exercise.

UNDP has developed a Users Guide to the VRA (Espanol) (Francais) as a tool to assist practitioners to conceptualize and execute VRA measurements in the context of CBA projects.

The SGP Impact Assessment System (IAS)

The CBA, being a project of the GEF Strategic Priority on Adaptation, aims to increase the resilience of ecosystems and communities to the impacts of climate change, generating global environmental benefits, and increasing their resilience in the face of climate change impacts. To this end, the CBA projects use the SGP's impact assessment system for monitoring achievements in GEF focal areas (focusing primarily on biodiversity and sustainable land management).

The IAS is composed of a number of quantitative indicators which track biophysical ecosystem indicators, as well as policy impact, capacity development and awareness-building.

UNDP Climate Change Adaptation Indicator Framework

CBA projects also track quantitative indicators from UNDP's adaptation indicator framework, corresponding to the thematic area on natural resources management. More information on UNDP's indicator framework can be found on the UNDP climate change adaptation monitoring and evaluation website.

 

This description applies to all projects implemented through UNDP's Community-Based Adaptation programme. Specific details on this project's M&E will be included here as they become available. *

Contacts: 
C-CAM
Ingrid Parchment
Executive Director
UNDP
CBA Project Management Unit
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
SPA
Project Status: 
Display Photo: 

Adaptation to Climate Change in Coastal Zones of West Africa (ACCC)

The interconnected coastal and marine environment of Mauritania, Senegal, Gambia, Guinea Bissau, and Cape Verde is a highly productive ecosystem of significant marine biological diversity. It also underpins a significant portion of livelihood opportunities of the coastal communities.  However, several assessments based on country specific National Communications to the UNFCCC, the second assessment of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change as well as GEF-funded projects such as the African Process have concluded that widespread coastal erosion due to climate change is one of the most serious anticipated environmental problems facing the region.

This UNDP project, "Adaptation to Climate Change: Responding to Shoreline Change and its human dimensions in West Africa through integrated coastal area management" is implemented by the UNDP Country Office in Dakar and UNESCO/IOC. The project seeks to implement priority country-driven strategies to adapt to climate-induced coastline erosion within the framework of integrated coastal area management planning. Through a combination of demonstration projects, integration of climate change into coastal management policies, capacity building initiatives including training, stakeholder consultations, climate and coastline erosion monitoring mechanisms, as well as  the promotion of regional cooperation, this project will bolster ecosystem resiliency to climate change along the Canary Current coastline.

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Photos: 
Level of Intervention: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (-17.3247041558 14.6572860364)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
15 villages and 3 urban communities (moughartaas), national environment directions and/or agencies.
Financing Amount: 
$3,300,000 (as of July 2012)
Co-Financing Total: 
$13,030,000 (as of July 2012)
Project Details: 

The project understands the risks that climate change poses to conservation efforts intended to sustain fisheries. The specific actions that the project is undertaking includes: country-specific coastal erosion assessments, consultations with stakeholders to identify exitisting strategies and capacities to address the problem of erosion, the selection of promising strategies (and implemented at pilot test sites), to monitor the results, and to disseminate lessons learned. “Strategies” include both adaptation actions (e.g., mangrove reforestation) and capacity-buildling (e.g., awareness-raising). Findings from the pilot projects will be used to integrate climate change and adaptation issues into existing coastal management, to develop plans and policies that induce cooperation across sectors,  to spur the creation or improvement of national policies that facilitate adaptation to climate change in coastal areas, to enhance regional cooperation in undertaking these challenges, and to establish a clearinghouse to store and disseminate lessons and best practices.

Other partner organizations (local, national and international):

  • Ministère de l’Environnement et de la Protection de la Nature, Direction de l’Environnement et de la Protection de la Nature (Senegal)
  • Ministère du Développement Rural et de l’Environnement, Direction de l’Environnement (Mauritanie)
  • Ministerio dos Recursos Naturais, Direcçao Geral  do Ambiente (Guinea Bissau)
  • National Environment Agency (Gambia)
  • Ministry of Environment and Agriculture, Direction Générale de l’Environnement (Cape Verde)

The overall objective of the Full Project is to mainstream adaptation to climate change into Integrated Coastal Area Management (ICAM) planning in the participating countries through the development and implementation of pilot adaptation activities in response to shoreline change. This will involve the development of strategies, policies and measures, based on technical/scientific information and appropriate policy instruments. A major preliminary objective will therefore be to pilot adaptation activities in a local to sub-regional context. There is a strong rationale for addressing the issue of adaptation and shoreline change not only at the national level but also through the development of a regional approach.

The ACCC project which is about adaptation to climate change in coastal countries of West Africa started in November 2008 by the regional inception meeting. Since then the main achievements of the project were: the installation of the regional and national teams; the organization of national inception meetings in 4 countries; the organization of  3 regional training workshops, one on climate change and coastal zones and two  on technical aspects of mangrove restoration and dune stabilization; the new web site was launched (www.accc-africa.org).

Background

Climate change scenarios for the West African region include an anticipated increase in mean surface temperature of up to 0.5º C per decade, increased evapotranspiration, increased rainfall variability and intensity, accelerated sea level rise of around 1 m per century, any reduced coastal upwelling resulting from weakening of the Azores high and the trade winds, exacerbated by disruption from freshwater plumes of continental origin (for additional details, refer to Annex A3). The resultant shifts in the hydro-graphical and oceanic conditions due to climate change are likely to exacerbate coastal erosion and sedimentation problems in the West African region (Allersman and Tilsmans 1993 – quoted in Africa Environmental Outlook (2000).

As all five countries are within the Canary Current Large Marine Ecosystem (and thereby aligned across an important environmental transition which is likely to be modified by sea level rise and climate change), a coastwise shift in climatic, hydro-graphical and oceanic conditions northward along the coast with global warming will be better identified and addressed by each of these countries if they understand features and processes in neighbouring state (as highlighted by Eric Bird during the STAP review of this proposal). 

This project is designed to foster such a collaborative effort by implementing a series of activities that lead to the improvement in the adaptive capacity to climate change of sensitive coastline ecosystems in the five countries. At the heart of the project is a combination of community based demonstration projects and UNDP & UNESCO led support to facilitate and build capacity to foster national level integration of policies that promote adaptive capacity to climate change of coastline ecosystems.

 

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Overall Project Objective: Develop and pilot a range of effective coping mechanisms for reducing the impact of climate change induced coastal erosion in vulnerable regions in five countries in West Africa.

  • Outcome 1: Pilot activities to increase he adaptive capacity and resilience of coastal ecosystems in regions vulnerable to climate change impacts implemented
  • Outcome 2: Climate change and adaptation issues and coastal area management policies and programmes integrated
  • Outcome 3:Monitoring of coastal erosion and capacity building in coastal management and planning enhanced
  • Outcome 4: Learning, Evaluation and Adaptative management increased
Monitoring & Evaluation: 

Project monitoring and evaluation wa conducted in accordance with established UNDP and GEF procedures and will be provided by the project team and the UNDP Country Office (UNDP-CO) with support from UNDP/GEF.  Monitoring and Evaluation Plan provides for a series of linked activities, including annual Project Implementation Reviews (PIR), Tripartite Reviews, Quarterly Project Reports, Work Plans, and independent mid-term and final project Evaluations. A novel feature of the monitoring strategy is that it provides for Program level monitoring, to ensure that project synergies are being realized, and activities dovetailed as planned.

Project Start:

Project Inception Workshop: held within the first 2 months of project start with those with assigned roles in the project organization structure, UNDP country office and where appropriate/feasible regional technical policy and programme advisors as well as other stakeholders.  The Inception Workshop is crucial to building ownership for the project results and to plan the first year annual work plan. 

Daily:

Day to day monitoring of implementation progress: will be the responsibility of the Project Manager, based on the project's Annual Work Plan and its indicators, with overall guidance from the Project Director. The Project Team will inform the UNDP-CO of any delays or difficulties faced during implementation so that the appropriate support or corrective measures can be adopted in a timely and remedial fashion.

Quarterly:

Project Progress Reports (PPR): quarterly reports will be assembled based on the information recorded and monitored in the UNDP Enhanced Results Based Management Platform. Risk analysis will be logged and regularly updated in ATLAS.

Annually:

Annual Project Review/Project Implementation Reports (APR/PIR): This key report is prepared to monitor progress made since project start and in particular for the previous reporting period (30 June to 1 July).  The APR/PIR combines both UNDP and GEF reporting requirements.  

Periodic Monitoring through Site Visits: 

UNDP CO and the UNDP RCU will conduct visits to project sites based on the agreed schedule in the project's Inception Report/Annual Work Plan to assess first hand project progress.  Other members of the Project Board may also join these visits.  A Field Visit Report/BTOR will be prepared by the CO and UNDP RCU and will be circulated no less than one month after the visit to the project team and Project Board members.

Mid-Term of Project Cycle:

Mid-Term Evaluation: will determine progress being made toward the achievement of outcomes and will identify course correction if needed.  It will focus on the effectiveness, efficiency and timeliness of project implementation; will highlight issues requiring decisions and actions; and will present initial lessons learned about project design, implementation and management.  Findings of this review will be incorporated as recommendations for enhanced implementation during the final half of the project's term.  

End of Project:  

Final Evaluation: will take place three months prior to the final Project Board meeting and will be undertaken in accordance with UNDP and GEF guidance.  The final evaluation will focus on the delivery of the project’s results as initially planned (and as corrected after the mid-term evaluation, if any such correction took place).  The final evaluation will look at impact and sustainability of results, including the contribution to capacity development and the achievement of global environmental benefits/goals.  The Terminal Evaluation should also provide recommendations for follow-up activities.

Project Terminal Report: This comprehensive report will summarize the results achieved (objectives, outcomes, outputs), lessons learned, problems met and areas where results may not have been achieved.  It will also lie out recommendations for any further steps that may need to be taken to ensure sustainability and replicability of the project's results.

Learning and Knowledge Sharing:

Results from the project will be disseminated within and beyond the project intervention zone through existing information sharing networks and forums. 

The project will identify and participate, as relevant and appropriate, in scientific, policy-based and/or any other networks, which may be of benefit to project implementation though lessons learned. The project will identify, analyze, and share lessons learned that might be beneficial in the design and implementation of similar future projects.

 

Contacts: 
UNDP
Mame Diop
UNDP Regional Technical Advisor
UNESCO
Isabelle Niang
National Project Manager/Coordinator
IOC/UNESCO
J. Barbiere
Executing Agency Contact
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
spa
Signature Programmes: 
Project Status: 

Implementation of Climate Change Adaptation measures in Coastal Areas of Uruguay

The project aims to put in place adaptive land planning and coastal management policies and practices to enhance the resilience of Uruguay’s coastal ecosystem to climate change, removing obstacles for adaptation in the process. To achieve this, the project will deliver the following outcomes: i) incorporate climate change risks into national land-use processes and key sectoral regulations governing coastal areas; ii) implement at the local level pilot adaptation policies and measures that can be included in current land-use planning processes to protect vulnerable coastal ecosystems; and iii) capture lessons and facilitate replication in other vulnerable parts of Uruguay’s coastline.

The Project’s General Objective is to promote adaptation measures necessary to protect coastal wetlands and international waters of the Rio La Plata Estuary from the impacts of climate change, through the sustainable use of coastal resources, one of the main environmental assets of the country. These adaptation measures are aimed at increasing the resilience of coastal resources to climate change, by building upon climate change vulnerability and adaptation assessments already carried out as part of Uruguay’s national communications and national studies, and are included in the country’s Second National Communication to the Convention.

Undefined
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (-54.9432556164 -34.9574800743)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Coastal Municipalities (corresponding to 6 administrative units) including (i) private households and tourism property in vulnerable areas; ii) fishing communities within the salinity front pilot area; iii) elementary and high schools; iv) local elected officials and v) private sector entrepreneurs.
Financing Amount: 
PDF A Amount: $25,000 USD; GEF Project Grant: $975,000 USD
Co-Financing Total: 
$2,922,900 USD
Project Details: 

Wetlands occupy 3% of Uruguay's total territory, which are significantly concentrated in coastal areas. In all of Uruguay's natural environments, wetland ecosystems are among the richest in terms of diversity and wild flora and fauna. The high productivity of these water-dominated ecosystems supports very large populations of wildlife, especially mammals, birds, and fish, as well as large extensions of unique botanical communities dominated by grasslands, macrophytes and palms. Bañados Del Este wetlands continue to be under serious threat because of historic unsustainable land-use practices that have deteriorated its ecological integrity, many of which continue today.

Wetland loss and degradation have occurred because of the large-scale development of rice fields, and the coastal areas have been deteriorated because of tourism encroachment and urban development (Canevari et al. 2001). The habitats present in Uruguay do not occur in isolation from each other but are marked by localized geographic features including rocks, hills and small ravines. This contributes to a highly-branched hydrological network and the importance of coastal wetlands is due to the high biological productivity taking place there.

The diversity of habitats and the complex array of transitional areas result in large diversity of species. Low-lying coastal areas and tidal flats are also particularly vulnerable to climate change as storm surges and tides can impact inland freshwater bodies and groundwater. Similarly, coastal waters linked to the Mar del Plata estuary are also increasingly vulnerable to the impacts of increased freshwater discharge and of land based sources of marine pollution.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 
  • Level 1) Information Gathering, Identification and Monitoring of critical exposed elements of coastal ecosystems and human settlements, including the provision of timely climate risk information, the identification of critical “hot-spots” or priority areas for the application of adaptation measures geared to monitor and reduce land-based sources of marine pollution, to increase the resilience of exposed assets and infrastructure-particularly in the tourism industry and to protect and restore critical coastal ecosystems- particularly wetlands from the impact of climate change.
  • Level 2) Identify barriers to adaptation in coastal areas of Uruguay, design policy interventions for their effective and efficient removal, for the improved understanding of current and future climate risks and design pilot adaptation measures and capacity development packages for priority sectors and key stakeholders.
  • Level 3) Incorporate Adaptation Policy into existing National Sustainable Development Policy, through targeted approaches to key sectors such as the tourism industry and other potentially vulnerable sectors to the impacts of climate change in Uruguay. Contribute to a National Adaptation Strategy for Coastal Areas in Uruguay, with an Action Plan designed to promote adaptation measures for critical exposed systems.

 

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

The progress made towards the achievement of the project's objectives is related to the involvement of key stakeholders, including policy and decision makers, municipal authorities and staff, the private sector, academia and coastal communities. Emphasis was made on increasing their awareness and understanding about the potential impacts of climate change on coastal areas and adaptation needs. In this context, the project participated in the creation of the Sistema Nacional de Respuesta al Cambio Climático, putting climate change as a high priority on the national agenda and recognizing the need to mainstream climate change into the national development strategy. This system is structured to coordinate national actions for mitigation and adaptation to climate change. It is made up of the following two bodies: the Coordinator Group with high-level representatives of Ministries, Municipalities, the Planning and Budget Bureau and National Emergency System; and the Advisory Committee with technical representatives from government, the private sector, academia and NGOs. The project also supported the integration of adaptation to climate change in land use plan proposals under consideration by the coastal departments of Colonia and Canelones. Finally, technical reports valuable to the project and aiming to mainstream climate change adaptation into national development plans were produced.

Contacts: 
UNDP
Jose Troya
Regional Technical Advisor
UNDP
Rafael Bernardi
Country Office Focal Point
Sistema Nacional de Respuesta al Cambio Climático - Uruguay
Luis Santos
Project Manager
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
spa
Project Status: 

Integrating Climate Change Risks into Resilient Island Planning in the Maldives

The small, low-lying atoll islands of Maldives are highly vulnerable to flooding and coastal erosion. More than 44% of settlements, including 42% of the population, and more than 70% of all critical infrastructure are located within 100 meters of shoreline. Intensive rainfall, storm surges and swell waves are expected to be aggravated through sea level rise and climate change effects on weather patterns. This will compound underlying trends of increasing coastal erosion and pressure on scarce land resources, and increase physical vulnerability of island populations, infrastructure and livelihood assets. 

In response, this UNDP-GEF project enabled the Government of Maldives to systematically assess the costs and benefits of different adaptation options in the fields of land use planning and coastal protection, and to develop the necessary institutional and individual capacity at national, provincial, atoll and island levels to enable decentralized and well-informed decision-making. 

This project closed in 2015.

Undefined
Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (73.5087957433 4.17781564785)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Local communities in the Maldives.
Financing Amount: 
4,490,000 (As of May 5, 2012)
Co-Financing Total: 
4,850,000 (As of May 5, 2012)
Project Details: 

The Republic of Maldives is an archipelago of 26 natural atolls and some 1,190 small, low-lying, coral islands distributed along an 860 km long chain, running north to south, in the Indian Ocean. The Maldivian atolls are the seventh largest reef system in the world and the largest in the Indian Ocean, with a total reef area of over 21,000 square km. Administratively, the country is divided into 7 provinces, 20 atolls, 194 'inhabited' islands and the capital Malé. The total population in 2008 was estimated at 309,575. Over a third of the population lives in Malé.

The major climate hazards to which the Maldives is exposed regularly include windstorms, heavy rainfall, drought, sea swells, storm surges and udha. Of these, the most serious are considered to be swell waves, heavy rainfall and windstorms, because of their high frequency and great potential for causing damage through flooding, erosion and other impacts. The combined effect of storm surges and tides, or storm tides, can be especially destructive. However, there is considerable variation in hazard patterns across the archipelago and even between islands in the same atoll, due to local variation in geophysical and climatic factors. For example, the northern atolls face a greater risk of cyclonic winds and storm surges than the southern atolls, where the risk is much lower because of proximity to the equator.

The Maldives is inherently vulnerable to climate and other natural hazards due to its geographic and geophysical characteristics including the small size, low elevation, narrow width and unconsolidated nature of its coral islands. Historically, the islands have exhibited considerable natural resilience to fluctuating sea levels, varying climatic conditions, wave action, extreme weather events and other major hazard events. The coral reefs, in particular, play an important role in protecting the islands from the impacts of extreme weather events, along with coastal sand ridges, natural vegetation and other natural features. The economic and biological values of the reefs have long been recognized. Additionally, the natural protective functions of the reefs as the country's first line of defense against a range of natural hazards including climate risks, became more widely understood during the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, the impacts of which would have been far greater without the buffering role of the reefs and other natural features.

The Government of Maldives fully recognizes that in order to effectively manage climate change risks, it is necessary to integrate climate risk planning and climate change adaptation into the country’s development policy and planning frameworks across all sectors and levels of government (i.e. from the national to the island level). Integrating climate risk considerations into island land use planning, coastal protection and coastal development is especially critical given the high degree of physical exposure of island populations and economic assets to climate-change induced wind and wave damage and short and long term flooding. Addressing these issues is identified as an urgent and immediate priority in the country's NAPA.

Source: UNDP Maldives Project Document (2009)

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 
  • Outcome 1: Enhanced capacity of national, provincial, atoll and island authorities and civil society leaders to integrate climate risk information into policy, planning and investment decisions
    • Output 1.1: Regional climate change scenarios for the Maldives analyzed and updated to provide more accurate climate change projections for national and local planning 
    • Output 1.2: Provincial/atoll and island authorities and civil society leaders for at least 4 islands understand climate change related risks and are able to prioritize appropriate land use planning and coastal protection measures
    • Output 1.3: Technical specialists in government departments responsible for land use planning, coastal zone management, coastal infrastructure development and land reclamation trained in the application of the guidelines developed under Outputs 2.1 and 2.2
    • Output 1.4: A climate risk information system established that enables universal access to meteorological and oceanographic data for adaptation planning purposes
  • Outcome 2: Integration of climate risk planning into key national policies that govern or impact land use planning, coastal protection and development
    • Output 2.1: Guidelines developed for climate risk resilient land use planning in the Maldives
    • Output 2.2: Guidelines developed for climate risk resilient coastal protection in the Maldives
    • Output 2.3: A national research strategy to address information gaps on climate change impacts in the Maldives
    • Output 2.4: Recommendations developed on how to integrate climate risk management into land use planning, coastal zone management, decentralization, privatization and disaster risk reduction policies
  • Outcome 3: Locally prioritized, appropriate adaptation options that reduce exposure to climate change risks demonstrated
    • Output 3.1: Climate change resilient land use plans designed and specific measures demonstrated on at least four islands
    • Output 3.2: “Soft” measures for coastal protection that incorporate future climate risks demonstrated in at least three islands
    • Output 3.3: Replication strategy for demonstrated adaptation measures developed
  • Outcome 4: Project knowledge and lessons learned compiled, analyzed and disseminated locally, nationally and internationally
    • Output 4.1: Information generated by the project publically available through a web-based portal
    • Output 4.2: Increased understanding of climate change risks and community-based adaptation options among island communities in 4 provinces/atolls
    • Output 4.3: Adaptation knowledge and lessons learned shared through the SIDS/AOSIS network, the ALM platform and other networks and platforms

Source: UNDP Maldives Project Document (2009)

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

Project Start:

  • Project Inception Workshop: will be held within the first 2 months of project start with those with assigned roles in the project organization structure, UNDP country office and where appropriate/feasible regional technical policy and programme advisors as well as other stakeholders.  The Inception Workshop is crucial to building ownership for the project results and to plan the first year annual work plan. 

Daily:

  • Day to day monitoring of implementation progress: will be the responsibility of the Project Manager, based on the project's Annual Work Plan and its indicators, with overall guidance from the Project Director. The Project Team will inform the UNDP-CO of any delays or difficulties faced during implementation so that the appropriate support or corrective measures can be adopted in a timely and remedial fashion.

Quarterly:

  • Project Progress Reports (PPR): quarterly reports will be assembled based on the information recorded and monitored in the UNDP Enhanced Results Based Management Platform. Risk analysis will be logged and regularly updated in ATLAS.

Annually:

  • Annual Project Review/Project Implementation Reports (APR/PIR): This key report is prepared to monitor progress made since project start and in particular for the previous reporting period (30 June to 1 July).  The APR/PIR combines both UNDP and GEF reporting requirements.  

Periodic Monitoring through Site Visits:

  • UNDP CO and the UNDP RCU will conduct visits to project sites based on the agreed schedule in the project's Inception Report/Annual Work Plan to assess first hand project progress.  Other members of the Project Board may also join these visits.  A Field Visit Report/BTOR will be prepared by the CO and UNDP RCU and will be circulated no less than one month after the visit to the project team and Project Board members.

Mid-Term of Project Cycle:

  • Mid-Term Evaluation: will determine progress being made toward the achievement of outcomes and will identify course correction if needed.  It will focus on the effectiveness, efficiency and timeliness of project implementation; will highlight issues requiring decisions and actions; and will present initial lessons learned about project design, implementation and management.  Findings of this review will be incorporated as recommendations for enhanced implementation during the final half of the project’s term.  

End of Project:

  • Final Evaluation: will take place three months prior to the final Project Board meeting and will be undertaken in accordance with UNDP and GEF guidance.  The final evaluation will focus on the delivery of the project’s results as initially planned (and as corrected after the mid-term evaluation, if any such correction took place).  The final evaluation will look at impact and sustainability of results, including the contribution to capacity development and the achievement of global environmental benefits/goals.  The Terminal Evaluation should also provide recommendations for follow-up activities.
  • Project Terminal Report: This comprehensive report will summarize the results achieved (objectives, outcomes, outputs), lessons learned, problems met and areas where results may not have been achieved.  It will also lie out recommendations for any further steps that may need to be taken to ensure sustainability and replicability of the project’s results.

Learning and Knowledge Sharing:

  • Results from the project will be disseminated within and beyond the project intervention zone through existing information sharing networks and forums.
  • The project will identify and participate, as relevant and appropriate, in scientific, policy-based and/or any other networks, which may be of benefit to project implementation though lessons learned. The project will identify, analyze, and share lessons learned that might be beneficial in the design and implementation of similar future projects.
  • Finally, there will be a two-way flow of information between this project and other projects of a similar focus. 

Source: UNDP Maldives Project Document (2009)

 

Contacts: 
UNDP
Mohamed Inaz
Country Officer
Najfa Shaheem Razi
Project Coordinator
UNDP
Keti Chachibaia
Regional Technical Advisor
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
ldcf
Project Status: 
Display Photo: 

Increased Resilience and Adaptation to Adverse Impacts of Climate Change in Guinea’s Vulnerable Coastal Zones

The impacts of climate change on the Guinean coastal zone are predicted to adversely affect coastal economic development, coastal natural resources, coastal agricultural production and globally, food security. According to current information on climatic variability and predicted climate change scenarios for Guinea, the country's long-term development is expected to be significantly affected by; (i) rising sea level and salt water intrusion; (ii) increased rainfall variability, including more frequent events of short and intense rains; and (iii) more frequent drought periods in the North of the coastal zone.

The project aims to mainstream Guinean Integrated Coastal Zones Management into development policies, strategies and plans at the local, prefectural and central levels. Additionally it seeks to assist farmers implement adaptive farming systems in mangrove areas. Contributions to respond to these barriers and reduce the level of vulnerabilities to climate change will be achieved through the pursuit of specific outcomes including: (a) integration of climate change and climate variability concerns into policies and planning processes at the state, national, sub-national and local levels; (b) implementation of risk reduction strategies and adaptation measures at pilot sites; (c) strengthening technical capacity to integrate climate risks into coastal zone management; and (d) disseminating lessons learned to key stakeholders.

For updates on UNDP Early Warning Systems and Climate Resilient Development projects, click here.

Undefined
Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (-14.2883767672 10.9549171186)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Coastal communities in Guinea
Financing Amount: 
2,970,000 (As of November 24, 2009)
Co-Financing Total: 
5,150,000 (As of November 24, 2009)
Project Details: 

The proposed initiative will facilitate a programmatic approach to climate change adaptation in Guinea by mainstreaming adaptation into central sectoral policies and sub-national policies and strategies in Lower Guinea. On the other hand, it will also aid the implementation of small-scale pilot adaptation initiatives at the community level.

This project recognizes that the overall enabling environment must support villages and communities as they adapt to climate change. As a result of this project, the enabling environment in the five concerned coastal Prefectures will have been modified accordingly. This will include: revised policies and development plans, with the mainstreaming of climate change; new tools to mainstream climate change into plans, programmes, policies and actions of prefectural technical and political departments; and a strong cadre of experts at the prefectural level with the skills and information to support village development. LDCF resources will be used to (a) integrate climate risk reduction into planning, policies and programs at the national and sub-national level in Lower Guinea. Local Development Plans of the coastal CRDs and the master plan for urban coastal cities, including the capital Conakry, will be reviewed and amended to take climate change, climate variability and adaptation responses into account in coastal zone management. 

This will be complemented through: (b) implementation of climate change and adaptation awareness raising campaigns among key stakeholders in socio-economic groups, i.e. loggers, fishmongers, fishermen, farmers, etc. and locally elected, prefectural and central administration staff. The project also recognizes that critical capacity must be established at the national level to support Regions, Prefectures, villages and communities as they adapt to climate change. In this regard, the project will develop new tools to mainstream climate change into national plans and programmes, and it will strengthen climate forecasting based on existing information and models, all while fostering a strong cadre of technical experts. Furthermore, an early warning system will be initiated to support farmers, villagers and communities in their decisions that are affected by meteorology and climate.

The project recognizes that measures to adapt to climate change must first and foremost be undertaken at the community and village level. The project therefore takes the community as a key entry point and as a key driver of change. It will contribute towards informing and implementing local and pragmatic adaptation responses through (c) demonstrations. In particular, the project will promote adaptation to saline intrusion and increased erosion due to a rise in sea level. Effective coastal management systems that take climate change concerns into account will be designed and established. Zoning (green habitats) in priority regions will be re-established and climate-resilient livelihood practices for communities developed. If successfully implemented, this is expected to reduce coastal inundation.

Finally, best practices will be disseminated for potential replication (with appropriate adjustments) in other areas. This initiative thus builds from the local level through demonstrations with the direct beneficiaries at a community level. It also recognizes the importance of building capacity at the national level while integrating climate adaptation and risk reduction methods into policies and programs.

Source: Guinea UNDP Project Document (November 24, 2009)

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 
  • Outcome 1: Capacity to plan for and respond to climate change in coastal areas improved
  • Output 1.1: Prefectures' master plans and zoning regulations reviewed and amended to incorporate adaptation concerns (Forécariah, Coyah, Dubréka, Boffa, Kamsar and the special zone of Conakry)
  • Output 1.2: Local development plans of coastal Rural Development Communities (CRD) revised to integrate climate change risks (15 "Communes Rurales de Développement – CRD")
  • Output 1.3: Key stakeholders possess the necessary training related to the risks of climate change on coastlines and the adaptation options
  • Output 1.4: System to disseminate climate change relevant agro-meteorological advice to critical coastal stakeholders initiated
  • Output 1.5: Strengthened capacities of research and teaching institutes so they can provide training, conduct research and share knowledge in costal zones
  • Outcome 2: Climate risk management measures implemented in coastal communities
  • Output 2.1: Appropriate coastal management systems aimed at reducing risks from rising sea levels identified, evaluated and developed for four vulnerable sites in the coastal area and in critical rice-growing plains (distributed in the Prefectures of Boffa and Forécariah)
  • Output 2.2: Alternative climate resilient livelihoods activities adopted by vulnerable communities
  • Output 2.3: Initiated Early Warning System to support coastal zone management and implemented monitoring of climate change risks and impacts in coastal zones
  • Outcome 3: Key national capacities for undertaking analytical work on the economics of climate change developed
  • Output 3.1: A portion of national budgets is allocated to climate change risk management
  • Output 3.2: Climate change adaptation is mainstreamed into budgets of the 5 Prefectures (including the special zone of Conakry)
  • Output 3.3: Staff in key Line Ministries has enhanced capacity to assess the costs and benefits of climate change, including adaptation and low carbon options
  • Outcome 4: Lessons learned from pilot demonstration activities; capacity development initiatives and policy changes are collected and widely disseminated
  • Output 4.1: Lessons learned extracted using a pre-established systematic framework
  • Output 4.2: Lessons shared with local partners and international agencies
  • Output 4.3: Five websites diffuse results, lessons learned and best practices of the project

Source: Guinea UNDP Project Document (November 24, 2009)

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

Project Start:

  • Project Inception Workshop: will be held within the first 2 months of project start with those with assigned roles in the project organization structure, UNDP country office and where appropriate/feasible regional technical policy and programme advisors as well as other stakeholders.  The Inception Workshop is crucial to building ownership for the project results and to plan the first year annual work plan. 

Daily:

  • Day to day monitoring of implementation progress: will be the responsibility of the Project Manager, based on the project's Annual Work Plan and its indicators, with overall guidance from the Project Director. The Project Team will inform the UNDP-CO of any delays or difficulties faced during implementation so that the appropriate support or corrective measures can be adopted in a timely and remedial fashion.

Quarterly:

  • Project Progress Reports (PPR): quarterly reports will be assembled based on the information recorded and monitored in the UNDP Enhanced Results Based Management Platform. Risk analysis will be logged and regularly updated in ATLAS.

Annually:

  • Annual Project Review/Project Implementation Reports (APR/PIR): This key report is prepared to monitor progress made since project start and in particular for the previous reporting period (30 June to 1 July).  The APR/PIR combines both UNDP and GEF reporting requirements.  

Periodic Monitoring through Site Visits:

  • UNDP CO and the UNDP RCU will conduct visits to project sites based on the agreed schedule in the project's Inception Report/Annual Work Plan to assess first hand project progress.  Other members of the Project Board may also join these visits.  A Field Visit Report/BTOR will be prepared by the CO and UNDP RCU and will be circulated no less than one month after the visit to the project team and Project Board members.

Mid-Term of Project Cycle:

  • Mid-Term Evaluation: will determine progress being made toward the achievement of outcomes and will identify course correction if needed.  It will focus on the effectiveness, efficiency and timeliness of project implementation; will highlight issues requiring decisions and actions; and will present initial lessons learned about project design, implementation and management.  Findings of this review will be incorporated as recommendations for enhanced implementation during the final half of the project's term.  

End of Project:

  • Final Evaluation: will take place three months prior to the final Project Board meeting and will be undertaken in accordance with UNDP and GEF guidance.  The final evaluation will focus on the delivery of the projects results as initially planned (and as corrected after the mid-term evaluation, if any such correction took place).  The final evaluation will look at impact and sustainability of results, including the contribution to capacity development and the achievement of global environmental benefits/goals.  The Terminal Evaluation should also provide recommendations for follow-up activities.
  • Project Terminal Report: This comprehensive report will summarize the results achieved (objectives, outcomes, outputs), lessons learned, problems met and areas where results may not have been achieved.  It will also lie out recommendations for any further steps that may need to be taken to ensure sustainability and replicability of the project’s results.

Learning and Knowledge Sharing:

  • Results from the project will be disseminated within and beyond the project intervention zone through existing information sharing networks and forums. 
  • The project will identify and participate, as relevant and appropriate, in scientific, policy-based and/or any other networks, which may be of benefit to project implementation though lessons learned. The project will identify, analyze, and share lessons learned that might be beneficial in the design and implementation of similar future projects.
  • Finally, there will be a two-way flow of information between this project and other projects of a similar focus. 

Source: Guinea UNDP Project Document (November 24, 2009)

Contacts: 
UNDP
Mohamed Efas Sylla
Country Officer
UNDP
Henry Diouf
Regional Technical Advisor
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
ldcf
Project Status: 
Display Photo: 
Expected Key Results and Outputs (Summary): 

Outcome 1 - Capacity to plan for and respond to climate change in coastal areas improved

Outcome 2 - Climate risk management measures implemented in coastal communities

Outcome 3 - Key national capacities for undertaking analytical work on the economics of climate change developed

Outcome 4 - Lessons learned from pilot demonstration activities; capacity development initiatives and policy changes are collected and widely disseminated

Lake Balaton Integrated Vulnerability Assessment, Early Warning, and Adaptation Strategies

In January 2006, the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the Global Environment Facility (GEF) –Strategic Priority on Adaptation (SPA) partnered with key actors in Hungary to address growing concerns about the ecological condition of Lake Balaton.  Using a GEF grant and substantial national co-financing through the Lake Balaton Development Coordination Agency (LBDCA), the overall purpose of the project was to gain a better understanding of Lake Balaton’s ecological and socio-economic vulnerability in order to build resilience to the multiple forces of global and local change. 

Lake Balaton, a fragile area with high human interaction, is sensitive to both natural and man-made influences.  Challenges brought about by climate change include frequent and severe water balance problems, lower levels of annual precipitation and problems concerning the biodiversity of the lake.  From an ecological and economical perspective, recent changes in water levels have alarmed both regional authorities and local stakeholders. To appropriately address these challenges, and in order to effectively adapt to the effects of climate change, a need to strengthen research on Lake Balaton’s vulnerability was identified.  For the project, integration of ecological and engineering knowledge with social and policy sciences was deemed equally essential.  Key lessons learned from the project implementation indicate that while it is important to establish partnerships with international networks, it is also imperative to target local stakeholders and rely more on local capacities.

Undefined
Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (17.687985227 46.8273712551)
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Lake Balaton communities
Financing Amount: 
Total amount: US$4,075,000; GEF (SPA): US$985,000

Inception Workshop presentation - Intro to Hungary's Lake Balaton project

The project’s specific objectives were to contribute to a better understanding of the Lake Balaton ecological and socioeconomic system’s vulnerability and resilience arising from multiple forces of global and local change, including climate change, and build capacity for more effective policy-making and adaptation measures in response.

Co-Financing Total: 
Government of Hungary: US$ 3,000,000; UNEP: US$50,000; IISD (in-kind): US$40,000
Project Details: 

Located in western Hungary, Lake Balaton is the largest freshwater lake in Central Europe and one of the shallowest large lakes in the world. With a mild climate, the flora and fauna of the surrounding landscape is particularly diverse and a large number of rare and protected plant species can be found in the area. Additionally, the Lake Balaton Resort Area (LBRA) has significant agricultural and recreational value. Arable land, vineyards and orchards take up some 80% of agricultural land (49.1 % of LBRA’s land is agricultural), but the economy of LBRA is driven predominantly by highly seasonal tourism. Summer tourists, concentrated in lakeside communities, can temporarily triple the area’s population, exerting substantial stress on the environment and infrastructure.

Due to its shallow profile and precarious water quality and water balance situation, Lake Balaton is uniquely sensitive to both natural and anthropogenic influences. While the ecological parameters of the Lake and its watershed have long been in constant change, current trends appear to indicate the beginnings of a new trajectory, characterized by accelerated change increasing the vulnerability of both ecological and socio-economic subsystems. Adverse changes in environmental variables in the watershed have already led to increased costs. Following many years of water quality problems, including eutrophication, a negative water balance caused water shortages, starting in 2000, which lasted for four years. The exact causes are still being debated, as multiple forces of change are at play, including climate change.

Given Lake Balaton’s heavy reliance on tourism as a primary source of livelihoods, the socio-economic consequences of ecological deterioration can be severe and immediate. If the frequency of years with negative water balance increases in the future, as predicted by applicable climate change scenarios, Lake Balaton and its coupled socio-economic system is expected to emerge as a highly sensitive indicator of vulnerability to global change.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 
Outcome 1:     Improved understanding of integrated vulnerability and adaptation options in the context of sustainable development in the Lake Balaton watershed
  • Output 1.1:   Description and analysis of baseline ecosystem and social system conditions and dynamics
  • Output 1.2:   Description and analysis of vulnerability under alternative adaptation scenarios

Outcome 2:     Strengthened organizational and individual capacity for interpreting emerging vulnerabilities, and increasing resilience by implementing adaptive measures in response
  • Output 2.1:   Capacity development strategy for adaptation
  • Output 2.2:   Training program to implement adaptation

Outcome 3:     Policy framework conducive to adaptive management strengthened
  • Output 3.1:   Policy mechanisms analyzed and developed to achieve better alignment between national policies and local adaptation needs

Outcome 4:     Pilot initiatives to facilitate adaptation to the impacts of climate change through direct action implemented
  • Output 4.1:   Guidelines for adaptation pilot projects
  • Output 4.2:   Adaptation pilot projects implemented

Outcome 5:     Knowledge generated and awareness raised of integrated vulnerability and adaptation approaches locally, nationally and internationally enhanced through knowledge management, dissemination and replication strategy
  • Output 5.1:   Engagement and influencing strategy
  • Output 5.2:   Synthesis report and other lessons learned and knowledge products prepared and communicated
  • Output 5.3:   Synthesis and communication of lessons learnt for regional and global audiences
Monitoring & Evaluation: 

Since its inception in 2006, the project has successfully addressed two of its main goals.  First was to gain a better understanding of the vulnerability and resilience of the Lake Balaton ecological and socio-economic systems in the face of global and local changes. Second was to build capacity for more effective policymaking and adaptation measures in response to the lake’s increasing vulnerability to change,. 

 The first goal was accomplished by developing an integrated assessment model that enabled the study of the dynamics of environment and socio-economic interactions. This model, along with the quantitative indicators used, collected data and analysis results, can be easily accessed through a public database – the BalatonTrend portal.  This portal facilitates informed dialogue among local stakeholders by providing them with key information on economic and environmental trends concerning the Lake Balaton region.  Another tool used was the customized Soil and Water Assessment Tool or SWAT – a model designed to predict the impact of management on water, sediments, and agricultural chemical yields in non-monitored watersheds.  This pool of information enabled the formation of model scenarios and related procedures for medium- and long-term time frames. 

The second goal was achieved through strengthened decision-making as local needs were incorporated into national and regional policies.  Through facilitated dialogue between stakeholders, the project provided contributions to the Lake Balaton Long Term Development Plan, the National Climate Change Strategy, the 3rd National Environmental Movement Plan for Hungary and the River Basin Management Plan of the Lake Balaton.

Information sharing via training programs and workshops were organized since adapting to climate change became an important priority of both the public and private sectors.  The goal was to propagate new knowledge about adaptability, resilience, and vulnerability.  This “influencing-strategy” enabled local stakeholders to determine and implement their own adaptive strategies.  In fact, 31 adaptation pilot projects were implemented by local NGOs in the framework of the Norwegian Grant Progamme.  These projects aim to improve Lake Balaton’s resilience by developing shoreline management and addressing increased population pressures.

By the project’s conclusion in December 2008, it was able to contribute to a better understanding of the Lake Balaton’s ecological and socio-economic system as it responds to constant global and regional changes.  The project was able to improve vulnerability assessment, adaptation capacity, and the alignment of local needs to regional and national policies.  It also was successful in engaging various stakeholders, such as educational and research institutions, NGOs and the general public, in the implementation of the project.

Contacts: 
UNDP
Keti Chachibaia
Regional Technical Advisor
Lake Balaton Development Council
Dr. Gábor Molnár
Project Manager
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
spa
Project Status: 

Community based Adaptation to Climate Change through Coastal Afforestation in Bangladesh

This project, executed by Bangladesh’s Ministry of Environment and Forests (MoEF) and implemented by UNDP, has reached 18,269 households engaging citizens in afforestation, agriculture, livestock, and fishery-based livelihood adaptation and training measures. The project promotes the diversification of livelihoods and income generation, for example, through the rational use of coastal land to produce forest, fruit and fish resources.

The Ministry of Environment and Forests (MoEF) of Bangladesh won the Earth Care Award 2012 (sponsored by the Times of India) for spearheading the  Least Developed Countries Fund (LDCF) project “Community Based Adaptation to Climate Change through Coastal Afforestation in Bangladesh”. This year’s Earth Care Awards category was "Community-based adaptation and mitigation".

This project was also recipient of an award in the knowledge competition of the Fifth International Conference on Community Based Adaptation (CBA5), held at Dhaka, Bangledesh, from 26-31 March 2011.

One of the significant adaptation response measures used is the development of FFF (Forest-Fish-Fruit) Model, a mound-ditch model that comprises short and long term resource and income generation, as well as livelihood diversification. This model is used in barren lands, located behind coastal mangrove forests. By using a combination of protective and productive vegetation, mound and ditch land structures, the FFF model has prevented land encroachment and ensured water security through rain water harvesting in ditches.  It offers multiple livelihood opportunities such as fish cultivation, irrigation for crops, and  conversion of barren land into productive land. This model accommodates families in the community with at least US $1,000 additional income/beneficiary/year.

For more information, view the Community based Adaptation to Climate Change Through Costal Afforestation Project Website

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Photos: 
Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
POINT (90.3296081694 22.370373749)
Financing Amount: 
3,300,000 (As of 10/29/2009)

BBC Amrai Pari Series 2 ATN Episode 07 Fish Fruit and Forest Model 1

Our immense gratitude toward BBC and its Media Action team for featuring one of our projects, Community based Adaptation to Climate Change Through Coastal Afforestation (CBACC-CA) in their highly celebrated TV series "Amrai pari" (Yes We Can). UNDP Bangladesh has been appreciated by national and international communities all over the world for this project particularly. In global context CBACC-CA has been awarded several times for its remarkable achievements of reducing vulnerability among the coastal communities.

Coastal Green Belt at Barguna

Media Report at Ekattor Television, Bangladesh, December 2014

Rays of Hope: CBACC-Coastal Afforestation Project

Adapting to Climate Change in the Coast of Bangladesh

Bangladesh - Building Mangrove Greenbelts Vulnerable Coastline

Bangladesh's location makes it one of the most vulnerable countries in the world to environmental disasters. Its giant network of rivers and vast low-lying flood plains make it both fertile and subject to erosion from flood, drought, and storms. As a result, protective coastal greenbelts, in the form of natural vegetation, can make the difference between life and death during severe weather and increasingly frequent, and deadly, cyclones. Mangrove forests, in particular, are critical to providing this necessary defense thanks to their intricate root systems.

Co-Financing Total: 
7,100,000
Project Details: 

Through alignment with a substantive forestry project that is financed by the Government of Bangladesh, this LDCF-funded project will increase the resilience and adaptive value of ongoing government investments in vulnerable areas and communities. Besides the immediate vulnerability reduction benefits this LDCF project will generate, it will leverage additional public, bilateral and multilateral investments for community-based adaptation in the context of business-as-usual forestry activities

In line with LDCF eligibility criteria and guidelines, the project will use LDCF resources to finance the additional costs of achieving resilience against climate change risks of a government-funded baseline programme, which is not yet taking climate change resilience aspects into account. The proposed project is exclusively country-driven, well coordinated with a number of other LDCF- and non-LDCF-funded projects, and will integrate climate change risk considerations into areas that are priority interventions eligible under LDCF guidelines (especially coastal development and forest management). In alignment with LDCF guidelines, the project will 

  • Expand the resilience of natural and social systems against climate change hazards, focusing on the community level;
  • Enable the development of response strategies to reduce the adverse effects of sea level rise; 
  • Improve local and national awareness and understanding of the benefits of preparedness for climate change risks.

Although the project is undertaking community training activities in nursery management, it does not consider additional livelihood support and -diversification activities that could complement and sustain afforestation activities over the longer term. The persistent lack of alternative livelihood options and the pressures of poverty leave local communities with limited incentives to nurture and protect new greenbelt plantations: The ensuing effects of human and livestock encroachment result in a situation in which many afforested patches need to be repeatedly re-planted before they reach maturity to serve as protective shields.

The baseline project is therefore at risk of perpetuating this problem and doing 'more of the same': Its objective is to create and conserve coastal forests with community participation, but the lack of livelihood resilience and the pressures of poverty (which are in turn exacerbated by climate-related shocks such as seasonal flooding and tropical cyclones) create a situation in which the incentives for encroachment on new plantations keep outweighing the incentives to nurture them.

This can only be reversed if the planting of trees is coupled with targeted activities to strengthen and diversify livelihoods. If greenbelts are not perceived as an essential protective asset of rural livelihood systems, they will be used as a free economic resource that will continue to get replenished by the government. As the underlying baseline project does not make a systematic connection between forestry measures and complementary investments to sustain these new plantations through long-term community engagement, the proposed LDCF funding is clearly an additional measure to ensure that greenbelt forestry in Bangladesh can evolve from the business as usual scenario to a long-term model which generates adaptation benefits for future generations.

An additional factor that makes the aforementioned baseline project vulnerable to the effects of climate change is the continued use of monoculture practices: The BFD propagates the use of a single mangrove species (locally known as 'Keora"), which is suitable to trap sediment on newly accreted lands but keeps encountering a new set of climate change-related challenges: The temperature of coastal waters is rising (following global trends), and there is greater variability in inundation levels, inundation times, as well as salinity of soil and water. As a result, Keora plantations suffer from a higher rate of diseases and fail to regenerate naturally. Field assessments have found that at the maturity stage of 'business as usual' mangrove plantations (after 15 years), only 800 to 900 trees per hectare survive out of 4444 seedlings that had originally been planted. This represents a loss of up to 80% of planted trees and generates big gaps in greenbelt structures on moderately accreted lands, which need to be continuously re-planted.

There is an urgent necessity to fill these gaps with a more innovative mix of mangrove species that have vigorous regenerating abilities and increase the genetic diversity of these greenbelts. The proposed LDCF project will introduce a diversified set of 8-10 selected mangrove species in 4 coastal districts, in which this problem is most apparent. In doing so, LDCF resources will address an evident climate change-related problem in a baseline afforestation project: Without LDCF investments, the baseline project will not be able to sustain critical plant density per hectare, and buffer the effects of higher water temperatures, higher/longer tidal inundations, and shifting salinity levels.

At present, it is fair to say that without additional improvements in the functional design and community ownership of the above baseline project, the planting of trees in coastal belts does not qualify as a long-term adaptation and/or resilience measure. There are evident and substantive problems in establishing and sustaining new greenbelt structures as protective buffer zones from climate-induced stresses, which need to be addressed by additional activities, such as: a) Changing the mix of mangrove and non-mangrove species to increase  the natural adaptive capacity of coastal forests; b) Providing economic incentives for communities to nurture, protect and conserve newly planted greenbelt structures; and c) Developing long-term benefit sharing agreements between communities and the national government for the selective logging of economic tree varieties.

Source: Bangladesh Project Identification Form (November 23, 2011)

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 
  • Outcome 1: Vulnerability of communities in new afforestation and reforestation sites reduced through diversified livelihood options and more effective greenbelts
    • Output 1.1: Community-based adaption and livelihood diversification measures, such as integrated fish/fruit/forest-farming, diversified livestock rearing and salt tolerant/flood resistant crop farming integrated with baselines afforestation and reforestation activities in 19 districts
    • Output 1.2: Diversified trial plantations of up to 10 mangrove and non-mangrove varieties are established in 4 districts to increase the adaptive capacity of greenbelt structures on newly accreted lands
  • Outcome 2: Strengthened community involvement in, and ownership of, forestry-based adaptation and climate risk reduction programmes
    • Output 2.1: Dialogue platforms established in all coastal districts to enable participative planning and management of climate resilient afforestation programmes between district, upazila and union officials and local communities
    • Output 2.2: A forest product benefit sharing agreement between coastal communities and national government is developed and adopted in at least 5 districts
    • Output 2.3: An institutional cooperation agreement and code of practice between community-based organizations and the Forest Department is developed and adopted to enable effective co-management of community-based adaption and afforestation programmes
  • Outcome 3: Communal livelihood assets in afforestation and reforestation sites are protected from extreme climate events through effective early warning and preparedness planning
    • Output 3.1: Effective early warning communications for extreme climate events are regularly disseminated to communities in all afforestation and reforestation sites
    • Output 3.2: Communal livelihood assets in new afforestation and reforestation sites are protected from extreme climate events through dedicated disaster preparedness and risk reduction measures (such as flood-resistant agricultural plots; protection of aquaculture and freshwater supply infrastructure; safe havens for livestock)

Source: Bangladesh Project Identification Form (November 23, 2011)

Monitoring & Evaluation: 

Project Start:

  • Project Inception Workshop: will be held within the first 2 months of project start with those with assigned roles in the project organization structure, UNDP country office and where appropriate/feasible regional technical policy and programme advisors as well as other stakeholders.  The Inception Workshop is crucial to building ownership for the project results and to plan the first year annual work plan. 

Quarterly:

  • Project Progress Reports (PPR): quarterly reports will be assembled based on the information recorded and monitored in the UNDP Enhanced Results Based Management Platform. Risk analysis will be logged and regularly updated in ATLAS.

Annually:

  • Annual Project Review/Project Implementation Reports (APR/PIR): This key report is prepared to monitor progress made since project start and in particular for the previous reporting period (30 June to 1 July).  The APR/PIR combines both UNDP and GEF reporting requirements.  

Periodic Monitoring through Site Visits:

  • UNDP CO and the UNDP RCU will conduct visits to project sites based on the agreed schedule in the project's Inception Report/Annual Work Plan to assess first hand project progress.  Other members of the Project Board may also join these visits.  A Field Visit Report/BTOR will be prepared by the CO and UNDP RCU and will be circulated no less than one month after the visit to the project team and Project Board members.

Mid-Term of Project Cycle:

  • Mid-Term Evaluation: will determine progress being made toward the achievement of outcomes and will identify course correction if needed.  It will focus on the effectiveness, efficiency and timeliness of project implementation; will highlight issues requiring decisions and actions; and will present initial lessons learned about project design, implementation and management.  Findings of this review will be incorporated as recommendations for enhanced implementation during the final half of the project's term.  

End of Project:

  • Final Evaluation: will take place three months prior to the final Project Board meeting and will be undertaken in accordance with UNDP and GEF guidance.  The final evaluation will focus on the delivery of the project's results as initially planned (and as corrected after the mid-term evaluation, if any such correction took place).  The final evaluation will look at impact and sustainability of results, including the contribution to capacity development and the achievement of global environmental benefits/goals.  The Terminal Evaluation should also provide recommendations for follow-up activities.
  • Project Terminal Report: This comprehensive report will summarize the results achieved (objectives, outcomes, outputs), lessons learned, problems met and areas where results may not have been achieved.  It will also lay out recommendations for any further steps that may need to be taken to ensure sustainability and replicability of the project's results.

Learning and Knowledge Sharing:

  • Results from the project will be disseminated within and beyond the project intervention zone through existing information sharing networks and forums. 
  • The project will identify and participate, as relevant and appropriate, in scientific, policy-based and/or any other networks, which may be of benefit to project implementation though lessons learned. The project will identify, analyze, and share lessons learned that might be beneficial in the design and implementation of similar future projects. 
  • Finally, there will be a two-way flow of information between this project and other projects of a similar focus. 
Contacts: 
UNDP
Aminul Islam
Country Officer
UNDP
Yusuke Taishi
Regional Technical Advisor
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Project Status: 
Programme Meetings and Workshops: 

1. Coastal Afforestation project receives Earth Care award 2012.

2. Coastal Afforestation project receives Adapting to Climate Change Award 2013.

3. National Workshop on Climate Resilient Adaptation Measures and Policy Recommendations organized by CBACC-Coastal Afforestation Project.

4. The project has achieved a new dimension: Anondo School.

Enhancing Resilience to Climate Change in Vulnerable Coastal Communities in Gambia

The project, 'Enhancing Resilience of Vulnerable Coastal Areas and Communities to Climate Change in the Republic of Gambia',  will restore and maintain 2,500 ha of the mangroves forests of Tanbi Wetlands (of which 177,285 Gambian depends directly or indirectly on their economic activities, its buffer zones, sewage sinks and coastal stabilization roles), the North Bank, Western and lower river regions through a co-management approach to act as an additional buffer against climate-induced pressures in coastal areas. These mangroves will directly complement hard physical measures designed to project lowland rice growing and economic investment in coastal areas (fish landing sites, hotels)  and will be planned an implemented alongside these hard measures through participatory planning

Also, climate resilient wetland and fisheries management strategies (such as resilient fisheries and wetland management plans, custom rules for wetland access and exploitation, community monitoring of fisheries quotas,) will be introduced and transferred to vulnerable communities in at least 20 wards in the Lower ans Central Valleys.

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Region/Country: 
Level of Intervention: 
Key Collaborators: 
Thematic Area: 
Coordinates: 
GEOMETRYCOLLECTION (POINT (-16.5893524145 13.336522519), POINT (-16.5893524145 13.336522519))
Primary Beneficiaries: 
Gambian coastal communities
Financing Amount: 
$8,900,000
Project Brief / Fact Sheet
Co-Financing Total: 
$41,388,000
Project Details: 

The project objective is to reduce Gambia’s vulnerability to sea-level rise and associated impacts of climate change by improving coastal defenses and enhancing adaptive capacities of coastal communities.

Expected Key Results and Outputs: 

Outcome 1: Climate change vulnerability of development activities and investments in coastal areas reduced through the design and construction of coastal protection measures

This outcome will finance additional investments in hard and soft coastal protection measures to help maintain critical economic infrastructure, as well as key livelihood activities, in the face of sea level rise and coastal degradation.

Outcome 2: Rural livelihoods in the coastal zone enhanced and protected from the impacts of climate change through the demonstration and the transfer of successful coastal adaptation technologies and the introduction of economic diversification
This outcome will finance the demonstration and the transfer to communities Climate resilient wetland and fisheries management and planning methods

Contacts: 
UNDP
Henry Diouf
Regional Technical Advisor
UNDP
Almay Camara
CO Focal Point
Climate-Related Hazards Addressed: 
Location: 
Funding Source Short Code: 
ldcf
Project Status: 
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